Almost Lost to History: King Tut and His Tomb Plus More Programs in May | Smithsonian Voices

Examine the life and times of Tutankhamun, as revealed by the artifacts preserved in his tomb in an online program on May 18.
Tarekheikal Photography

Monday, May 2 

Art + History: Guernica by Pablo Picasso: Conceived as a response to the brutality of the Spanish Civil War, Picasso’s monumental 1937 mural Guernica grew to symbolize the atrocities and horror of all human conflicts. Lecturer Paul Glenshaw examines the source of its impact, a stunning synthesis reflecting the 20th century’s developments in art, technology, warfare and psychology in a work whose power is timeless. Enrolled participants in the Smithsonian World Art History Certificate earn 1/2 credit. 6:45 p.m. ET $20-$25

 

Tuesday, May 3

Mothering: A Reflective Writing Workshop: Discover the power of reflective writing inspired by art, guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. The work of two British artists, painter Evelyn De Morgan and poet and playwright Carol Ann Duffy, provide the foundation for an exploration of the myriad meanings of mothering in our lives, in the natural world and in the creative process. 10 a.m. ET $40-$45

 

Wednesday, May 4

From The Jazz Singer to A Star Is Born: A History of the Movie Musical: Media expert Brian Rose brings an all-singing, all-dancing galaxy of stars to life in a fascinating nine-decade chronicle of the history of this uniquely American form, the movie musical. He includes excerpts highlighting the performers who made the film musical one of the genres we most love. 12 p.m. ET $20-$25

 

Thursday, May 5

The Art of Buddhism: Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines how differences in practice among Buddhism’s various schools were expressed through art, the cultural and sectarian influences that informed the makers of Buddhist art, and the ideological differences that shaped it. Enrolled participants in the Smithsonian World Art History Certificate earn 1/2 credit. 6:30 p.m. ET $30-$35

 

Friday, May 6

Lincoln About Town: Following in a President’s Footsteps: As one of this country’s most enduring and legendary figures, Abraham Lincoln left an impression both on the United States and the city of Washington. Spend a day following in his footsteps with author and journalist Chuck Raasch as he guides a journey through the city to sites connected with the fascinating president, from the Willard Hotel to the Old Soldiers Home to the memorial that honors him. This program conducted in person and is designed for participants that live in the DC metro region. 8:30 a.m. ET $160-$210

 

Saturday, May 7

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Drawing for the Everyday Overthinker: Get out of your head by drawing the world around you. In an online studio arts workshop using simple drawing activities, learn how to better connect with your sense of vision, recognize how your mind colors your actions and experiences, and gain practice stepping away from your thoughts. 1 p.m. ET $35-$45

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Quickly capture your travels with loose lines and painterly colors with the quick-sketch watercolors method taught during a two-session online course on May 7.

Cindy Briggs

Quick-Sketch Watercolors for Travelers: Quickly capture your travels with loose lines and painterly colors with the quick-sketch watercolors method taught during a two-session online course. This technique is perfect for studies, travel journals, and finished fine art. The second session will be held Saturday, May 14. 11 a.m. ET $95-$115

 

Monday, May 9

Creativity Seminar: In a four-session course, students in any studio art practice can spark the next step of their creative growth in this unique ideas-focused seminar. Exchange ideas, build confidence, give and receive feedback and deal with common issues such as procrastination, creative blocks, flow, problem solving and completion. 10:30 a.m. ET $245-$265

Indiana Jones: The Men Behind the Myth: The Indiana Jones series is one of the most popular and iconic film franchises in the history of Hollywood. But just how accurate is it? In a three-session series, historian Justin M. Jacobs explores the centuries of key figures and perspectives that influenced the creation of this cinematic hero, revealing how the films diverge or converge with historical realities. The first session focuses on the history behind Indiana Jones. 6:45 p.m. ET $25 

The Geology of Africa: Southern Africa: Join geologist Kirt Kempter for a fascinating survey of geologic history of the continent of Africa with a focus on South Africa, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia. 7 p.m. ET $25-$30

 

Tuesday, May 10

Food for the Body and Soul: Advocating for Community through Culinary Traditions: Chef Janet Yu, owner of Hollywood East Café in Wheaton, Maryland, talks about recipes, her work preserving Chinese food culture, and mentorship. This program is part of the spring Cooking Up History series, presented in collaboration with the Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum and the National Museum of American History, with support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. 6:45 p.m. ET This program is free but requires registration.

 

Wednesday, May 11

Great Courtroom Dramas and the Stories Behind Them: Hollywood loves lawyers, judges, jurors, surprise witnesses, smoking guns and falsely accused heroes. Yale film professor Marc Lapadula discusses several of the best and most compelling cinematic courtroom dramas including: Judgment at Nuremberg, To Kill a MockingbirdMy Cousin Vinny, Philadelphia, and The Caine Mutiny. 6:30 p.m. ET $30-$35 

Great Composer-Pianists: Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin and Brahms: Popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin guides a unique four-session series that explores the creative minds—and hands—of a quartet of piano pioneers celebrated for their prowess as composers and performers. Each lecture includes a live performance of a work by the spotlighted composer. 6:30 p.m. ET $100-$110

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Explore the history and construction of Afghan geometric decorations with a graduate of Turquoise Mountain Institute in Kabul, Afghanistan in an online studio arts course that begins Sunday, May 15.

Sughra Hussainy

Sunday, May 15

Introduction to Afghan Geometric Design: For centuries, religious and secular Islamic manuscripts have contained beautiful geometric decorations. In an online six-session studio arts course, explore the history and construction of these traditional designs with Sughra Hussainy, a graduate of Turquoise Mountain Institute in Kabul, Afghanistan. Then, create designs with graph paper and a compass. 1 p.m. ET $195-$225

 

Wednesday, May 18

Almost Lost to History: King Tut and His Tomb: Egypt specialist Jacquelyn Williamson examines the life and times of Tutankhamun, as revealed by the artifacts preserved in his tomb. She also uses the objects to uncover the scandalous heritage of the famous boy-king who was erased from Egypt’s own history, only to find immortality in the modern world. 6:30 p.m. ET $30-$35

 

Thursday, May 19 

Italian Olive Oil: From Sacred Grove to Contemporary Art: Olive trees, their branches, and their fruit have been featured in the art of the Mediterranean for thousands of years. Join Italian artist Francesco Ciavaglioli, Rome-based curator Cornelia Lauf, and Luanne Savino O’Loughlin, an importer and retailer for Olio2Go, as they showcase the ancient bonds between agriculture and art in a lively visual journey that engages the senses. 12 p.m. ET $20-$25

Billie Holiday: Lady Sings the Blues: When Billie Holiday stepped in front of a microphone, audiences heard more than a one-of-a-kind voice: She revealed a life, in all its pain and triumph. Jazz expert John Edward Hasse follows Holiday’s extraordinary journey from abused Baltimore girl to troubled but brilliant singer. 6:30 p.m. ET $30-$35

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Experience the expansive farms, forests, parks and rich history of Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve during an in person tour on May 20.

Martin Radigan

Friday, May 20

Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve: A Taste of History: Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve is a 93,000-acre rural jewel of the Capitol area, with expansive farms, forests, parks and a rich agricultural heritage that parallels Maryland food traditions and wider American foodways. Reserve resident Christine Rai leads an all-day visit that highlights how this area has provided an abundant foodshed for millennia, with an added focus on its compelling history and natural beauty. This program conducted in person and is designed for participants that live in the DC Metro Region. 8 a.m. ET $145-$195

 

Saturday, May 21

How To Read Great Literature: The writings of authors from Homer, Dante, and Shakespeare to James Joyce, Marcel Proust, and Toni Morrison, among many others, have an enduring connection with readers. But how do we find our way into the worlds they create? Literature professor Joseph Luzzi offers a fascinating guide to reading and interpreting celebrated works, past and present. 10 a.m. ET $70-$80

 

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Join the Italian-born partners behind Maryland’s Via Roma restaurant on May 22 as they share the story behind the unique Roman variety of pizza, pinsa, and host a three-course lunch that puts it in the spotlight.

Via Roma’s Biagio Cepollaro and Tonino Topolino

Sunday, May 22

Pinsa: The Next Big Thing in Pizza: You may be loyal to your favorite style of pizza, but have you tried pinsa, the unique Roman variety that’s starting to make fans in Italy and the United States? Join the Italian-born partners behind Maryland’s Via Roma restaurant as they share the story behind pinsa and host a three-course lunch that puts it in the spotlight. This program conducted in person and is designed for participants that live in the DC Metro Region. 12 p.m. ET $75-$85

 

Monday, May 23

The Rise of Supertall Buildings: The most tangible expression of the new urban age is “supertall” buildings, megastructures that are dramatically bigger, higher, and more ambitious than any in history. Author and architect Stefan Al, who has worked on some of the largest buildings in the world, reveals the advancements in engineering, design, and data science that have led to this worldwide boom. 6:45 p.m. ET $20-$25

 

Wednesday, May 25

Smashing Statues: The Rise and Fall of America’s Public Monuments: Why do Americans care so much about statues? And who gets to decide which ones should stay up and which should come down? Author Erin L. Thompsontraces the turbulent history of American monuments and the complex mix of aesthetic, legal, political, and social issues involved in the contemporary battles they spark. 7 p.m. ET $20-$25

 

Tuesday, May 31

Africa’s Struggle for Its Art: Reclaiming a Stolen Heritage: For decades, African nations have fought for the return of countless works of art stolen during the colonial era and placed in Western museums. Shortly after 1960, when 18 former colonies in Africa gained independence, a movement occurred to pursue repatriation. Art historian Bénédicte Savoy reveals this largely unknown but deeply important history. Enrolled participants in the Smithsonian World Art History Certificate earn 1/2 credit. 12 p.m. ET $20-$25

 

Maria Lewis

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